Healthy Living With An Illness

If you’ve ever been poorly for any length then you’ll begin to understand what it is like to live like that every single day of your life. Just so that you know what I’m talking about I’ll give you a quick run down on what I’ve finally been diagnosed with after all these years of searching.

Heterozygous Factor V Leiden

I know, it’s a bit of a mouthful to say and it’s certainly more than a handful to live with. Basically what that means for me is that my body cannot break down clots which has lead to an extensive Deep Vein Thrombosis in my left leg. I have to take twice daily heparin injections to stay alive but I’ve written a separate post explaining exactly what Factor V is so if you want to you can check it out here.

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

This is a complication of my Factor V Leiden disease and has recently landed me in hospital for a month and home care for an extra 3. A deep vein thrombosis is a clot that gets stuck in the largest vein in  your lower body, normally found in the calf. There are many risk factors for getting a DVT and it is wise to be aware of them as they can cause further complications such as Venous Insufficiency and Post-Thrombotic Syndrome.

Venous Insufficiency

Venous insufficiency occurs when there has been damage to the valves in the veins. If the valves don’t work in a vein then blood will pool in the lower extremities and can cause a whole host of nasty complications such as ulcers on the skin, swelling, and pain. Here is a previous article that goes into detail if you want to find out more.

Post-Thrombotic Syndrome

I must say, this complication is not fun (most complications never are). It is a condition that at least 50% of DVT patients will suffer from and there is currently no cure. Symptoms include pain, swelling and fatigue with more information to be found here.

Asthma

This particular condition I have had since I was a child, however, since my hospitalization it has gotten worse because I had a few pulmonary embolisms (clots that went to my lungs). I am currently on twice daily steroids and an inhaler when I need it. Asthma is caused by irritants making the windpipe contract making it difficult to breathe but the steroids help to calm down the reaction.

Chronic Fatigue Sydrome

Now, this is an interesting one, I’m on the fence as to whether I actually have this or not but either way the treatment is the same. Basically, I don’t know whether my fatigue is caused by my blood disease or whether it’s because I’ve got CFS. I wont really know until my blood is under control which might take a couple of years to do. Anyway, here are a couple of links about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, what it is, and what it’s like to live with it.

 I also have two things that I couldn’t live without at the moment:

  • Arnica
    to help take away the bruising and soreness from my injections.

There you have it, my reasons for trying to live a health life with a handful of chronic illnesses. I admit I’m not good everyday but I always try and do better than the day before. I hope you enjoy reading this on my journey towards a healthier me.

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2 Comments

Filed under Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Heterozygous Factor V Leiden, Medicines

2 responses to “Healthy Living With An Illness

  1. Stephanie

    I am a bit confused because I have fvl the heterozygous gene and was told by my hemophilia doctor that I do not need blood thinners as long as I stop having babies which we did. I only had to take thinners during pregnancies. I have had two clots in total (after childbirth) both cleared up good with lovenox for six months.
    I drink green tea to keep my blood healthy and flowing. I am wondering because I see you mentioned they are making you take thinners when you have the mild gene. It concerns me.

    • Hi Stephanie, everyone is different when it comes to this. The only reason I’m on permanent blood thinners is due to the extent of my clot which cannot be removed, the blood thinners also make sure that it doesn’t grow any bigger. I’m also badly asthmatic and had clots in my lungs so the blood thinners are also preventing those from forming again and scarring up my lungs.

      I wouldn’t worry about it as your doctors appear to be on the case and they’ve looked after you whilst pregnant. If you have any other concerns though I’d recommend talking to a hematologist just to make sure you’re on the right treatment assuming any is needed.

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